These courses are for online or hybrid delivery.

The major early and late medieval philosophers and their schools of thought that have been influential in theology, for example: Augustine, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, John Duns Scotus, Nicholas of Cusa, William Ockham.

The modern problem of the compatibility between an authoritative divine revelation and human knowledge, freedom, and experience. The development of a “theology of revelation” from Vatican I to Vatican II. Revelation and the Enlightenment. Dei Verbum. Jesus Christ as the revelation of God and humanity. Pluralism and the unicity and universality of the Christ event. The Church’s teaching on revelation and faith. The Christian act of faith. The question of truth and of on-going revelation.

The modern problem of the compatibility between an authoritative divine revelation and human knowledge, freedom, and experience. The development of a “theology of revelation” from Vatican I to Vatican II. Revelation and the Enlightenment. Dei Verbum. Jesus Christ as the revelation of God and humanity. Pluralism and the unicity and universality of the Christ event. The Church’s teaching on revelation and faith. The Christian act of faith. The question of truth and of on-going revelation.

The biblical origins of the Christian Liturgy.  The development of distinct rites in the Eastern and Western Church with a special attention to the ongoing development of the Roman Rite. The theology of Liturgy as a work of the Trinity, an Action of Christ and the Church. The sanctification of the Year and the Day through the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours. The liturgical movement prior to and following the Second Vatican Council. Cultural, pastoral, and ecumenical considerations.

The biblical origins of the Christian Liturgy.  The development of distinct rites in the Eastern and Western Church with a special attention to the ongoing development of the Roman Rite. The theology of Liturgy as a work of the Trinity, an Action of Christ and the Church. The sanctification of the Year and the Day through the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours. The liturgical movement prior to and following the Second Vatican Council. Cultural, pastoral, and ecumenical considerations.

A process of spiritual, human and pastoral formation for all lay students. This process facilitates growth in human maturity, spiritual development, health and wellness, personal integrity and professional development. It recognizes the inter-relatedness in life of theological education, human maturing, and the universal call to holiness. It will draw from Scripture, the rich spiritual traditions of the Church and from the social sciences.