These courses are for online or hybrid delivery.

The historical development of the Church in the Medieval Era from the beginning of the eighth century to 1500. Monasticism and religious orders, heretical movements and popular religion, intellectual development, Church and State relations.

Anglicanism from the 16th century to the present with a view to identifying theological direction and emphasis which have been characteristic of this community. The role played by formularies, representative writers and liturgy in the formation of Anglican self-understanding will be examined. Anglicanism and the ecumenical movement.

The basic elements of moral theology since Vatican II. Biblical and theological themes that define the person in Christ. The Christian meaning of sin, virtue, conscience, law and moral discernment. The Christian experience of conversion and reconciliation in the way of discipleship.

A general introduction to the major areas of philosophy and philosophical method.  Issues that may be addressed include knowledge, truth, beauty, God’s existence, evil, free-will, happiness, morality, political theory.

The nature of theology. The relationship between theology and the following: revelation (Scripture and Tradition); spirituality and liturgy, philosophy and the human sciences. Faith and reason. The high points of theology throughout the history of the Church. The importance of theology for the Church. Theology and the teaching office of the Church. Theology and Church before and after Vatican II. Writing skills in theology.

The contemporary problematic in Christology. The claims and challenges posed by Jesus in his preaching and life. His rejection, death and resurrection. Jesus Christ as divine and human. Traditional and contemporary Christologies.

The basic elements of moral theology since Vatican II. Biblical and theological themes that define the person in Christ. The Christian meaning of sin, virtue, conscience, law and moral discernment. The Christian experience of conversion and reconciliation in the way of discipleship.

The nature of theology. The relationship between theology and the following: revelation (Scripture and Tradition); spirituality and liturgy, philosophy and the human sciences. Faith and reason. The high points of theology throughout the history of the Church. The importance of theology for the Church. Theology and the teaching office of the Church. Theology and Church before and after Vatican II. Writing skills in theology.

The sacraments of initiation. Their biblical roots and their historical and theological development in the Christian Church. Contemporary revisions, pastoral applications and ecumenical consideration.


The contemporary problematic in Christology. The claims and challenges posed by Jesus in his preaching and life. His rejection, death and resurrection. Jesus Christ as divine and human. Traditional and contemporary Christologies.