Available courses

The historical development of the Church from the second century to the rise of Islam. The relationship of Church and Empire, the beginnings of monasticism, the contributions of women, the development of institutions and doctrine, and the missionary activity of Christians beyond the Greco-Roman World.

Founders of religions and the meaning of religion. Christianity in relation to other religions. An introduction to Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, and Amerindian Religions. New religious movements. Interfaith dialogue, especially between Christians and Jews.

The basic elements of moral theology since Vatican II. Biblical and theological themes that define the person in Christ. The Christian meaning of sin, virtue, conscience, law and moral discernment. The Christian experience of conversion and reconciliation in the way of discipleship.

Origins of Christian community and relationship with the mission of the Church. The meaning and development of ordained ministry as well as history of lay ministry and the relationship between the two. Current issues and ecumenical initiatives. Contemporary models of collaboration in ministry.



An introductory practicum consisting of a ministry placement under individual supervision, related classes, and theological reflection in groups on the experience gained. Students must meet with the Director of Field Education at the beginning of their 2nd academic year in order to schedule for an assessment and ministry placement.

Basic human and Christian values at stake. The rapid development in medical technologies and the growing complexity of the moral issues involved. From extensive case studies, an attempt to develop adequate models for moral evaluation and pastoral counselling.

The course deals with the meaning, foundations and principles of spiritual direction in the Church’s tradition. It examines the Biblical foundations and historical development of spiritual direction and its relation to a person’s growth in faith, in prayer and in the Christian life. It will explore some practical aspects of the ministry of spiritual direction and look at the qualities required for those called to this ministry.


An introduction of the basic issues involved in the ministry of pastoral counselling. Emphasis on heightening the students' understanding of theory, skills, personal maturity and related ethical issues.

The Sacraments of Initiation. Their biblical roots and their historical and theological development in the Christian Church. Contemporary revisions, pastoral applications and ecumenical consideration.

A study and critique of issues and trends in contemporary religious education, including theories, curricula, Church documents, and the General Directory for Catechesis. Teaching strategies and their approach to religious education are discussed and practiced.

This course introduces students to the Sacred Scriptures of the Christian faith, their academic study and their interpretation.  The various books of the Old and New Testaments of the Catholic Bible are introduced in relation to their historical, cultural, and religious backgrounds, with timely references to geographical and archaeological data.  Concurrently, students are introduced to the concepts of biblical inspiration, biblical inerrancy, and the formation of the canon.

This course also includes a seminar that explores the question of the interpretation of scripture with the Mind of the Church, during which key Church documents will be analyzed while some major contributions from the world of academia to the field of biblical interpretation will be considered.  The aim is to equip students with a range of exegetical tools and building blocks that will be necessary in subsequent scripture courses in their chosen program, and indeed in their various ministries as exegetes of Sacred Scripture.

This course considers the Canonical literature traditionally attributed to the Fourth Evangelist (Gospel of John; 1, 2 and 3 John, the Book of Revelation).  An initial consideration of the milieu from which the Johannine Community/School emanated (date, authorship, and provenance) serves as a backdrop to a closer examination of the literature.  The entirety of the Johannine corpus will be read, with particular attention given to the distinctive Christology (Signs, “I AM” Sayings), Pneumatology (the Spirit-Paraclete), Ecclesiology, Missiology, Eschatology, and overall theology of this Canonical body of literature.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.

The nature of theology. The relationship between theology and the following: revelation (Scripture and Tradition), spirituality and liturgy, philosophy and the human sciences. Faith and reason. The high points of theology throughout the history of the Church.  The importance of theology for the Church. Theology and the teaching office of the Church. Theology and Church before and after Vatican II.  Writing skills in theology.


On-Campus students will be particpating in the forum discussions with the Online students.

The nature of theology. The relationship between theology and the following: revelation (Scripture and Tradition), spirituality and liturgy, philosophy and the human sciences. Faith and reason. The high points of theology throughout the history of the Church.  The importance of theology for the Church. Theology and the teaching office of the Church. Theology and Church before and after Vatican II.  Writing skills in theology.


On-Campus students will be participating in the forum discussions with the Online students.

The sacraments of initiation. Their biblical roots and their historical and theological development in the Christian Church. Contemporary revisions, pastoral applications and ecumenical consideration.

The historical development of the Church in the Medieval Era from the beginning of the eighth century to 1500. Monasticism and religious orders, heretical movements and popular religion, intellectual development, Church and State relations.

This course considers the Canonical corpus of the Old Testament traditionally referred to as the Prophets.  The literature is investigated as a distinct body and in relation to the Canon of Scripture, with particular emphasis given to historical (pre-exilic), literary (including text critical), exegetical and theological questions.  The relationship between the Israelites and God—as portrayed by the biblical prophets—is explored from the perspective of messianism and ‘new covenant theology’.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.

This course considers the Canonical corpus of the Old Testament traditionally referred to as the Pentateuch (the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy) and their cognate literature known as the Historical Books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah). The literature is investigated as a distinct body and in relation to the Canon of Scripture, with particular emphasis given to historical, literary (including text critical), exegetical and theological questions. The relationship between the Israelites and God—as portrayed by the biblical authors of the Pentateuch and Historical Books —is explored through the theme of covenantal love.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.

The modern problem of the compatibility between an authoritative divine revelation and human knowledge, freedom and experience. The development of a “theology of revelation” from Vatican I to Vatican II. Revelation and the Enlightenment. Dei Verbum. Jesus Christ as the revelation of God and humanity. Pluralism and the unity and universality of the Christ event. The Church's teaching on revelation and faith. The Christian act of faith. The question of truth and of on-going revelation.

The contemporary problematic in Christology. The claims and challenges posed by Jesus in his preaching and life. His rejection, death and resurrection. Jesus Christ as divine and human. Traditional and contemporary Christologies.

The modern problem of the compatibility between an authoritative divine revelation and human knowledge, freedom and experience. The development of a “theology of revelation” from Vatican I to Vatican II. Revelation and the Enlightenment. Dei Verbum. Jesus Christ as the revelation of God and humanity. Pluralism and the unity and universality of the Christ event. The Church's teaching on revelation and faith. The Christian act of faith. The question of truth and of on-going revelation.

The contemporary problematic in Christology. The claims and challenges posed by Jesus in his preaching and life. His rejection, death and resurrection. Jesus Christ as divine and human. Traditional and contemporary Christologies.